Detailed instructions for the Faculty Mentorship Statement

The Faculty Mentorship Statement asks you to describe two main things:

  1. Your mentorship philosophy
  2. Why you want to be involved in the SROP

In many cases, the SROP will be students’ first mentorship experience with a faculty member. These mentorship statements will help students get a sense of fit with each advisor. Furthermore, we believe that it will be uplifting for students to read the mentorship statements en masse, fostering a community right away.

Example content

The goal of the Faculty Mentorship Statement is to describe your approach to research mentorship and why you are donating your time to the SROP. You can approach this statement by opening your most recent teaching statement or an old grant where you described your mentorship philosophy and training plans.

You have 150 words to describe your mentorship philosophy and goalss. This equates to approximately 5 – 6 sentences. Here is an example of how you might use these sentences:

  • Sentence 1 states the things you most value in mentorship
  • Sentences 2 and 3 describe the mechanisms through which mentorship occurs (e.g., lab meetings)
  • Sentence 4 lists the training that would be received
  • Sentences 5 and 6 describe what motivated you to get involved
Want to see some examples?

How your Faculty Mentorship Statement will be used

Applicants will review the faculty mentorship statements along with the research projects when ranking their top three projects in the SROP application. We expect these two statements to be weighed together by the students in some subjective manner.

Published by pagegould

Dr. Elizabeth Page-Gould's preferred pronouns are she/her/hers. You are welcome to call her "Liz." She is the current website administrator for the Canada SROP and Quant-TIDE. Liz is an abolitionist, friend, wife, mother, activist, mentor, and colleague. She is also the Canada Research Chair in Social Psychophysiology, an Associate Professor of Psychology, and the Chair of the Graduate Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto.

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